WSVD 2021/22 Scores Exceeded National Pre-COVID Scores Despite COVID-19

Aug 17, 2021

Last year’s K-4 math and reading scores in West Valley exceeded national pre-COVID standard test scores in nearly every grade. Recent tests show student scores across the nation dipped significantly due to COVID-19. However, while WVSD’s score declined slightly, our young scholars were able to retain strong academic success even in the face the pandemic.

Reading

Math

Percent at Grade Level - Spring

Percent at Grade Level - Spring

Pre-COVID

2020/21

2020/21

Pre-COVID

2020/21

2020/21

National

National

West Valley

National

National

West Valley

Grade K

81%

79%

87%

Grade K

73%

67%

77%

Grade 1

63%

52%

64%

Grade 1

58%

46%

65%

Grade 2

63%

52%

68%

Grade 2

57%

44%

65%

Grade 3

69%

62%

73%

Grade 3

62%

46%

58%

Grade 4

51%

45%

62%

Grade 4

67%

48%

69%

Superintendent Peter Finch attributes the success to the partnership between home and school. “This was not easy for parents or staff, but both stepped up and did what was needed to make sure our students continued to learn,” said Finch. “A lot of it was really parent dedication and teacher skill.”

He noted how teachers prepared packets of homework, online lessons, and instructional tools each week and commended teachers and principals for making home visits to ensure families could connect to online classrooms.

Stacy Drake, Principal at Cottonwood Elementary, recognized the teachers, saying that COVID forced teachers to become more intentional in their teaching and more focused on individual student needs.

“Teachers didn’t have the luxury of just following the curriculum and assuming all students were learning,” said Drake. “We had to identify what each student needed, look at student’s data, and determine what they were lacking or needed to succeed. Teachers weren’t taught to do that or directed to do that. They had to be self-directed and super-intentional to see what their students needed and try to start teaching just those skills. It was a crash course in individualized learning.”

Both Finch and Drake also noted that they felt fortunate to work for a school district that was able to supply all children K-12 with Chromebooks, provide those without internet access with cellular hotspots, and ensure the technology was in place for teachers and students to stay connected with technology tools such as Loom videos, Zoom videoconferences, and Google classroom, as well as online learning programs such as iReady and Imagine Learning. They also recognized the pressure put on parents and how family support translated to student success.

And while it may be too soon to look positively at COVID-19, Drake said one thing the pandemic did do was force administrators, teachers, and others into a new way of thinking.

“There are a lot of things we’re looking at now and thinking we should keep because it’s just a better way of doing things for our kids.”